A 2019 Forecast For the Housing Market

Where is the Housing Market Headed in 2019? [INFOGRAPHIC] | Simplifying The Market

Some Highlights:

  • ­Interest rates are projected to increase steadily throughout 2019, but buyers will still be able to lock in a rate lower than their parents or grandparents did when they bought their homes!
  • Home prices will rise at a rate of 4.8% over the course of 2019 according to CoreLogic.
  • All four major reporting agencies believe that home sales will outpace 2018!

If you’re looking to apply for a new home all you have to do is click here.

Get the upper hand when searching for a new home. Make sure you get pre-approved for a new home BEFORE you start the home search.

-Ed

No need to fear a housing crash. Here’s why..

4 Quick Reasons NOT to Fear a Housing Crash

4 Quick Reasons NOT to Fear a Housing Crash | MyKCM

Referencing the Keeping Current Matters: http://bit.ly/2CpiVyK

There is a lot of uncertainty regarding the real estate market heading into 2019. That uncertainty has raised concerns that we may be headed toward another housing crash like the one we experienced a decade ago.

Here are four reasons why today’s market is much different:

1. There are fewer foreclosures now than there were in 2006

A major challenge in 2006 was the number of foreclosures. There will always be foreclosures, but they spiked by over 100% prior to the crash. Foreclosures sold at a discount and, in many cases, lowered the values of adjacent homes. We are ending 2018 with foreclosures at historic pre-crashnumbers – much fewer foreclosures than we ended 2006 with.

4 Quick Reasons NOT to Fear a Housing Crash | Simplifying The Market

2. Most homeowners have tremendous equity in their homes

Ten years ago, many homeowners irrationally converted much, if not all, of their equity into cash with a cash-out refinance. When foreclosures rose and prices fell, they found themselves in a negative equity situation where their homes were worth less than their mortgage amounts. Many just walked away from their houses which led to even more foreclosures entering the market. Today is different. Over forty-eight percent of homeowners have at least 50% equity in their homesand they are not extracting their equity at the same rates they did in 2006.

4 Quick Reasons NOT to Fear a Housing Crash | Simplifying The Market

3. Lending standards are much tougher

One of the causes of the crash ten years ago was that lending standards were almost non-existent. NINJA loans (no income, no job, and no assets) no longer exist. ARMs (adjustable rate mortgages) still exist but only as a fraction of the number from a decade ago. Though mortgage standards have loosened somewhat during the last few years, we are nowhere near the standards that helped create the housing crisis ten years ago.

4 Quick Reasons NOT to Fear a Housing Crash | Simplifying The Market

4. Affordability is better now than in 2006

Though it is difficult to afford a home for many Americans, data shows that it is more affordable to purchase a home now than it was from 1985 to 2000. And, it requires much less of a percentage of your income today than it did in 2006.

4 Quick Reasons NOT to Fear a Housing Crash | Simplifying The Market

Bottom Line

The housing industry is facing some rough waters heading into 2019. However, the graphs above show that the market is much healthier than it was prior to the crash ten years ago.

We love that home. It’s everything we want. I think we’ll wait to make an offer.

Welcome back to my blog. I have some major information I want to share with you this week, so let’s dive in. First, take a look at this info-graph below. 20170526-EHS-APR-PAT-STM-1046x1354-2

This information is coming from Census data and information from the National Association of Realtors. Why is this important? This is important because the fact that there are more buyers in the market than there are homes available. Now, what does that mean for you? It means that if you are not fully prepared when you start your home search, you could lose the opportunity of landing your dream home.

First things first, you need to sit down and figure out your budget. Do not call a mortgage company and ask them, “how much do I qualify for?” That is the WRONG question to ask. What you should do is figure out what is going to be a comfortable monthly payment and how much can you comfortably afford for a down payment on a home. When you have this figured out, then you need to get in contact with a local mortgage expert. They will help guide you through the entire process. Many of them work with local real estate agents, so they can even be a good source to get a recommendation for a Realtor based on where you are looking to buy.

Looking on-line for a home isn’t a bad way to start. It gives you an idea of what kind of homes are on the market and what kind of price point you can expect for the type of home you are looking for. I suggest a website like Realtor.com to start a home search. Any of these other big names sites don’t update nearly as frequently as Realtor.com and realistically they are just there to gather your information and sell it to Realtors and mortgage companies anyways. So stick with Realtor.com or a local real estate company’s home search. You’ll get far better and more accurate results.

Real-Estate-NewsSo what is the game plan before you go home shopping? The first thing you do is contact a local mortgage professional, like myself *hint *hint* 🙂 and they can help get some of your initial questions answered about the home-buying process. another thing I recommend is gathering together some of your financial documentation and making sure you are well prepared to answer questions that your local mortgage pro might ask.  Click here to see a standard checklist of items your mortgage pro will need. Another HUGE thing I want to tell you…for your own benefit…USE SOMEONE LOCAL! I cannot stress this enough. Using these national call center types of companies is not the best idea. First, you’re more than likely going to deal with someone who reads off a script and is extremely inexperienced. Secondly, they do NOT have a vested interest in your success. You are a number and if you close, great. If not, they move on to the next deal. To them, it is a numbers game. Third, local professionals know WAAAY more about the area you are buying in compared to some call center loan officer in another state. Finally, when realtors see that you are working with someone local, you have better odds of getting your offer accepted. Local realtors know who the best mortgage professionals are, and I will tell you that any knowledgeable and successful agent will tell you to use someone local.

pexels-photo-534151.jpegI hope this week’s blog has been able to shine some light on the home buying process and why it is important to be prepared when you are searching for homes. Don’t wait if you found that perfect place, because you take a chance of it not being there tomorrow.

Good luck on your home search!

-Ed

My Credit is a Little Rough. What Should I Do? 

Tips for Raising Your Credit Score

good credit scores just ahead

Welcome back to my blog everyone! The topic I want to dig into this week is credit. Why do you need it? Why is it important? Does it really have an impact on getting approved for a loan or not? Want to see what your credit is currently at for that new home loan? Click here!  I did something a little different with this blog post. I co-wrote this blog with my guy Sam Parker. Let me give you a little insight about my boy Sam. He is the Founder and CEO of MyCreditGuy.com and this guy knows the “ins and outs” of credit. He is my go to guy for a reason and the bottom line is that I only work with the best, and I assure you that is what Sam is. Now, let’s dig into this blog!

b24b8f258b7a59e85250f426c6ab5489a72cdc6d4f77abb05d4101ed65cfd2ec Just like anything in life, if you want to get better at it, you have to practice. If you want that promotion at work, then you have to put in the time and effort. If you want to become a better writer, then you have to practice writing. Same goes with your credit score. If you want to have a credit score that is out of this world good, then you have to put in effort to build and maintain it. Improving your credit score can save you hundreds or thousands of dollars on big purchases throughout your life. The best part about it is that it really isn’t that hard to accomplish. You just have to make sure that you are willing to put in the effort. A word to the wise, get to know the credit scoring model. Each person’s credit profile might be a little different, but there are five basic things that you can do for a little “Spring Cleaning” of your credit report.
Be responsible — Pay all your bills on-time each month. Late pays, collections and bankruptcies all have negative effects on your credit. Be smart, be responsible and make sure all your debts are paid on-time.

Check your credit regularly and monitor it for inaccuracies — Don’t let your credit suffer because of inaccurate information. If there is information on the report that is wrong, contact the creditor or original creditor and have them fix it. If you have a hard time with that, get the credit bureaus involved. Use a monitoring service, such as Credit Karma. Is it the most accurate? No, but it gives you some insight on your credit report without having a negative impact on your score.

ct-credit-scores-0602-biz-20150601Don’t over extend yourself — Just because Capital One gave you a $1,000 credit limit doesn’t mean you should go rack that thing up. Keep your credit card balances below 30% of the limit. For example: $1,000 credit limit = Don’t use more than $300

Time is valuable — The length of time that you have credit impacts your scores. So the longer you have a positive reporting account, with no late payments and a responsible balance, the better your score will be.

Stop having everyone and their mother check your credit — Talk about a red flag. Applying for numerous things in a short period of time can be disastrous for your credit. This is a sign to the credit reporting agencies that you may be experiencing financial difficulties. Too many hard inquiries = knockout punch to your credit scores.

Now, I want to let Sam takeover and blow your mind with these credit tips. Here is a video with some tips on what NOT to do when trying to build or maintain a great credit score.

Sam Parker here, great information Ed. It’s tough to beat the tips you’ve already given but I have just a few more and I’ll expand on a few that you’ve already made!

Don’t Pay Off Collections or Other Negative Item – I know, that just doesn’t make sense. However, the credit scoring algorithm is a bit flawed. See, when you pay off an older negative item it will update that account and bring the activity date current. When that happens, the credit scoring algorithm views this collection as new/current because of the date. In turn your scores will drop BECAUSE you paid your bill. So unless either Ed, one of his staff, or one of our staff instruct you to pay a collection, just hang onto your money for now.

No New Purchases – It’s so tempting to start buying the new furniture and electronics that will make your new home complete. However, too many times people will either use their credit cards to make these purchases OR open a new, in-store, credit card. When you use a credit card it impacts your balance to limit ratios which are a huge factor in your credit scores, you don’t want to use credit cards at all during the home loan process and if anything, get them paid down as much as possible. Also, when you open a new account the credit scoring algorithm sees it as a risk. You will most certainly see a drop in your credit scores not only because of the new debt load but because you just introduced a new account to the mix. This should go without saying but do not buy a new vehicle during the mortgage process either.

Don’t Close Accounts – As many people are getting their financial house in order they think it’s time to pay off and close out as many accounts as possible. While we advocate paying accounts down, closing them will be eliminate ALL of the pay history that you’ve accumulated and you’ll definitely see a drop in credit scores.

 

I appreciate everyone checking out the new blog, and Sam I appreciate you taking the time to co-write this with me. As always if you have any questions feel free to reach out to me. I am also including Sam’s contact information below. If you have any credit questions, he is the guy to contact. Thanks again and don’t forget to SHARE this with your friends and family, give us some FACEBOOK love!!!

Hustle. Succeed. Repeat.

-Ed Stojancevich

screen-shot-2016-10-06-at-5-46-03-pm  Download Ed’s Mortgage App, Click Here!

-Sam Parker

MyCreditGuy  Download Sam’s FREE Credit App, Click Here

This information is for educational purposes only and does not constitute legal or financial advice. You should always seek the advice of a legal or financial professional before making any legal or financial decisions.

I am going home shopping without getting pre-qualified or pre-approved.

Hey what’s going on everyone! Welcome back to my blog and boy do I have some good stuff for you. Now let’s dive in!batman

If you haven’t caught the sarcasm in my headline, let me start by saying I am being EXTREMELY sarcastic. Going to look for a home before getting qualified is a horrible thing to do. It makes as much sense as trying to keep a popsicle cold with a blow dryer, IT JUST DOESN’T WORK! Now let me tell you why, let me give you the 411 on why this is frowned upon.

In more markets, the consensus is that there are more buyers than available homes for sale. This means there is more competition out there when looking for your “perfect home.” Sellers won’t even entertain your offer unless you are pre-qualified to buy. If you get into a bidding war with another buyer and your competition has already done the footwork to make sure they qualify, you can bet your bottom dollar you are going to lose the bidding war. Check out this link by Freddie Mac on why getting pre-qualified/pre-approved is important if you’re a serious home buyer. Also, when going through this process, make sure you are using a local professional. I know this may not seem important right now, but ask any Realtor in the area and they will tell you nightmares about using out-of-state lenders or those on-line lenders, if you think getting a mortgage is as simple as pushing a button, you’re wrong. Many of these “television or on-line lenders” are making it seem like it is that easy. Don’t let them fool you. If you are prepared and know what you and your family are looking for, the process can be very simple if you’re working with the right lender.first-time_mortgage_header

Another big thing is knowing your budget. I talk to hundreds of people every month and one of the most common things that I hear is, “I need to know how much I qualify for.” This is one of the biggest mistakes you can make as a buyer. You need to figure out what is going to be a comfortable monthly payment and what a comfortable down payment will be. As a well-respected lender in my area, I make sure to ask those two questions. The last thing that I want to do is qualify someone for a $300k home if they’re only comfortable spending $200k. I put people in loan programs that are going to be advantageous to their entire family. The last thing I ever want is a family to struggle to make their mortgage payment. There is no need to “Keep Up with the Joneses,” maintain a good family budget and make sure you save for any unexpected expenses.

screen-shot-2017-01-17-at-12-50-28-pmGetting pre-qualified to buy a home is important, we’ve established that. I want to show you what lenders look at when you give them your information. As Freddie Mac explains, there are 4 C’s in the mortgage process.

  1. Capacity: This looks at your ability to repay the loan. A lender will look at your ability and future ability to pay your debt payments and pay them on-time.
  2. Capital/Cash Reserves: This looks at the amount of verifiable money that you have saved in the bank or investments that can be sold for cash.
  3. Collateral: This refers to the property that you are buying.
  4. Credit: This looks at your credit history, score and the history of paying your bills on-time.

When a lender looks at these 4 things, this will help them determine if they can lend you the money to purchase the home. In many cases, you will only know 3 of these before you start your home search because the collateral hasn’t been identified yet. Capacity, Capital and Credit are enough for a lender to decide if you qualify. Click here to see a list of items a lender will typically require to see if you qualify.

screen-shot-2017-01-17-at-12-51-10-pmIf the down payment is an issue, there are different ways we can address that. You can get gifts from immediate family members and you could also see if you qualify for down payment grants or 100% financing programs. Click here to see what you qualify for. If you are ever unsure about credit score, down payment or anything else related to buying a home, contact your local pro and have them guide you through the process, click here. They do this every day and know exactly how to help you get into the home of your dreams.

Always remember, you want to look amazing to your sellers. You want to make sure you are FULLY prepared and ready to write a good aggressive offer on the home you want. In some cases, you may not get a second chance or the opportunity to make a counter offer.

funny-real-estateI want to leave you with one last thing. Make sure you are being represented by a Realtor when buying a home. This does NOT cost you anything. The best parts about buying a home with a Realtor is that they are working for you, they negotiate the best possible terms when buying a home, they get PAID FOR BY THE SELLERS and they are a great resource for local market conditions if/when you ever decide to sell your home in the future. Click here and I can get you setup with the areas TOP REALTORS if you need a good recommendation.

Thanks for reading, please share this with your family, friends, enemies, the neighbor across the street or the person you bumped into at the grocery store. Anyone will be able to benefit from this article.

Find out what you qualify for, click here to go to my application.

See you all the next time!

-Ed

You are not a real estate expert just because you watch HGTV.

re-meme

Welcome back everyone to my blog. This week I want to talk about something important, especially with the growing popularity of HGTV and those trendy shows like “Property Brothers,” “Flip or Flop,” or “Fixer Upper.” These shows are great to see the process of where a home is and what it can be after a bunch of remodeling and renovation. The downside of these programs is the fact that they make the whole process seem easy. Another thing to remember is that they are cramming anywhere from 8-12 weeks’ worth of work into a 30-minute episode. Don’t be naive and think that this process is easy. Remember, this is ENTERTAINMENT not real-life. Check out this article from Fox News about the stars of “Flip or Flop.” It looks like they’re catching some heat for offering classes that making the home flipping process easy. You can check out the article here.

flip-or-flopI had a few clients this year that told their realtor, “I watch those shows on television, so I know how the negotiation process works.” This is such a huge mistake. First, let me just tell you that when you are buying a home and you hire a realtor, you do not pay that realtor. The best part about it is that they work for you but get paid by the seller. It is literally a win/win situation. They’re negotiating the best possible deal for you and get paid by the seller. This is literally having your cake and eating it too. Another misconception is that people can buy a $50k house and put in $50k worth of renovation and then have a home that is worth $500k. These shows are often filmed in different areas of the country which have a higher cost of living, therefore the prices of these homes are a lot higher than the local market.

If you are looking at buying a home that needs a lot of work, this is what I recommend. Make sure that the home is in decent shape. What I mean by that, is make sure there are no major defects in the home. When obtaining a mortgage, a home must be appraised. Even if you are putting down a substantial down payment, the home still needs to be in acceptable condition. At the end of the day, the home is the collateral for the loan, so the home must be in acceptable condition to the lender. Another thing to remember is that you need to have the renovation money saved up. Not all lenders offer renovation loans, and if they do, the work and renovations must be completed by an approved contractor. Most people don’t realize this and they think that they can do the work themselves and build some “sweat equity.”fixer-upper

Here is what you should do when looking to buy a “fixer-upper.” Do your research and make sure you hire the right realtor to help you find a property that fits your need. (If you need help with this click here and I can put you in contact with some of the area’s best realtors.) Make sure that you have enough money saved up, not only for down payment, but for the renovations as well. Having a realtor with experience in this will help you as well because they can give you advice on roughly how much of a renovation budget you should have. Make sure you are in contact with the right lender so they can give you advice on properties that you are looking at as well. Remember, the realtor and lender are on YOUR team, we want to make sure that this goes as smooth as possible for you.

As always thanks for viewing my blog. Download my free Smartphone app. Text “FreeApp” to 44222 and get a direct link to your phone.

-Ed

NAHB Releases New Home Building Employment Estimates by State and Congressional District — Eye On Housing

The new NAHB study presents the most recent and comprehensive estimates of home building employment, including self-employed workers, by state and congressional district. NAHB Economics estimates that out of 9.6 million people working in construction in 2015, close to 3.8 million people worked in residential construction, accounting for 2.5% of the US employed civilian labor…

via NAHB Releases New Home Building Employment Estimates by State and Congressional District — Eye On Housing